It is important that the parties (customer and co-packer) are correctly defined in the agreement. These include the state and country of creation, as well as the nature of the enterprises (e.g. B limited liability company, limited liability company or partnership). Distributors must share their product formula with their co-packer, which is why co-packer agreements are a kind of intellectual property license. The way a formula is shared with a co-packer is an indication of the discipline with which a company treats its trade secrets. Start negotiations with a large NDA that requires permanent confidentiality for trade secrets. When concluding the co-packing agreement, all changes should be assigned forever to the distributor. The agreement must have certain parts that are common to all contracts and some parts specific to the wage packaging industry. Trust in an outsourcing relationship is key, but a well-designed co-packing or co-manufacturing contract can help reduce risk and define obligations and requirements for both parties. Everyone asks, “How much insurance do I need?” First, check all the promises made to big and retail.

Companies like Whole Foods and Kroger require their manufacturers to sign “supplier agreements.” These agreements always contain insurance requirements. Reviewing the requirements of these supplier agreements establishes the basis for adequate coverage. Second, don`t pack without recall insurance that is not part of a general commercial liability insurance. Someone in the co-packing chain must take out recall insurance, whether it is the distributor or the manufacturer. In addition, the agreement should specify which party is responsible for costs related to additional services, for example. B additional storage, pallet rental, urgent orders, waste treatment and receipt of products. . . .